Priorities

houseOn Wednesday morning, I headed to a Christian business owners meeting in may area. A friend had invited me to attend and learn more about the group.

I knew where the meeting location was, however, since the roads are a little angled in our area and I’m still not sure on timing and I was running a little late, I decided to use my GPS Navigator to tell me the best way to get there.

The GPS had me drive through a residential neighborhood just north of my location, which I thought was odd. After all, the main roads lead right to the location. But I thought there might be a back entrance or something and so I followed the Navigator.

I drove through a neighborhood filled with huge houses. Two stories, three and four car garages. The yards were beautiful, and even in a residential area the homes were set back from the street at least forty or fifty feet. Standard upper middle class development, I thought at first.

And then I saw the kids. First the two at what was probably the bus stop, and then a teenage girl walking back in to her house. The kids were so small against the houses. And the girl especially, almost looked lonely surrounded by all of the expansiveness.

At the meeting, the devotion was centered on verses about money. In particular that the love of money is the root of trouble. The writer of the devotion then went on to explain that money, just as money, isn’t a problem in and of itself. Money is a tool that we can use for good, for the benefit of others, for sustaining ourselves. It is the love of money — above the love of God and others — that gets us in to trouble.

I flashed back to my drive through the neighborhood on the way there, and realized it was definitely a learning moment. In some ways, our society expects us to want the big house with the four car garage and all the trappings that come with it. But maybe, instead of using the money to gratify our own egos, we should use it as a tool to benefit others.

(c) KJD Legal